K-SMNP

Background

The United Nations Human Settlements Programme, UN-Habitat, is the United Nations agency for human settlements. It is mandated by the UN General Assembly to promote socially and environmentally sustainable communities, towns and cities with the goal of providing adequate shelter for all. The main documents outlining the mandate of the organization are the Vancouver Declaration on Human Settlements, Habitat Agenda, Istanbul Declaration on Human Settlements, the Declaration on Cities and Other Human Settlements in the New Millennium, and Resolution 56/206.

By working at all levels and with all relevant stakeholders and partners, the agency contributes to linking policy development and capacity-building activities with a view to promoting cohesive and mutually reinforcing social, economic, environmental and countries’ policies and programmes in human settlements in conformity with international practices and covenants.

UN-Habitat Afghanistan:

The United Nations Human Settlements Programme, UN-Habitat, has been working within Afghanistan since 1992 with funding support of USAID, Japanese and Australian Governments, EU, DFID, CIDA, Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), Kingdom of the Netherlands and several bilateral donors as well as the World Bank. During this period, its Programme expanded to include a wide range of human settlements initiatives, from small-scale neighbourhood level improvement schemes to community empowerment.

UN-Habitat has been assisting the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan through a number of projects, both urban and rural, supported by different donors:

 

UN-Habitat rolls out a Municipal Governance Support Programme (MGSP), funded by EU in nine cities: Kabul (the capital); Herat, Jalalabad, Kandahar, and Mazar-e-Sharif (Grade A cities); and Kunduz and Farah (Grade B); and Bamyan and Nili[1] (smaller but fast-growing and strategic cities). The Programme will support these nine municipal authorities to survey and register all properties within municipal boundaries (for Kabul: one districts/Nahia). This will improve land management (e.g. increase tenure security and reduce land grabbing) as well as significantly expand the potential tax base for municipalities. To facilitate the strategic and sustainable use of local revenues, the Programme will support municipalities to undertake strategic urban planning at municipal level to promote Local Economic Development (LED), stimulate investment and expand inclusive service delivery. The process will be driven by local stakeholders and focus on linking urban planning with finance (public and private investments) to ensure plans are realistic and actually implemented. As Afghanistan is rapidly urbanizing, such strategic planning is an essential tool for managing urban growth and expanding access to services in already crowded and largely-informal cities.

The Programme will also improve the enabling environment for municipal governance by providing technical support to central government-level authorities, including the General Directorate of Municipal Affairs (GDMA), the Afghan Land Authority (ARAZI), and Ministry of Urban Development Affairs (MUDA), to improve national policies, legislation and guidelines.

[1] Exact cities are still under negotiation with IDLG/GDMA. Charikar was to be included but has been dropped as SHAHAR will implement in this city. Nili has therefore been included.

Kabul municipality is like other municipalities in Afghanistan, which is distinct legal, administrative, and self-sustaining entities with responsibility for providing public services for which they are likewise permitted to collect revenues from charges, fess, and fees: Safayi Fee, business license fees, rental and sale of real estate, including land, sale of movable properties, and penalties, among others. However, Kabul Municipality is not depended to IDLG and directly to President Palace.

Municipalities with technical support of UN-Habitat rolls out a Municipal Governance Support Programme (MGSP), funded by EU in nine cities: Kabul (the capital); Herat, Jalalabad, Kandahar, and Mazar-e-Sharif (Grade A cities); growing and strategic -(smaller but fast [1]and Kunduz and Farah (Grade B); and Bamyan and Nilicities). The Programme will support these nine municipal authorities to survey and register all properties within municipal boundaries (for Kabul: two districts/Nahia). This will improve land management (e.g. increase tenure security and reduce land grabbing) as well as significantly expand the potential tax base for municipalities. To facilitate the strategic and sustainable use of local revenues, the Programme will support municipalities to undertake strategic urban planning at municipal level to promote Local Economic Development (LED), stimulate investment and expand inclusive service delivery. The process will be driven by local stakeholders and focus on linking urban planning with finance (public and private investments) to ensure plans are realistic and actually implemented. As Afghanistan is rapidly urbanizing, such strategic planning is an essential tool for managing urban growth and expanding access to services in already crowded and largely-informal cities.

The Programme will also improve the enabling environment for municipal governance by providing technical support to central government-level authorities, including the General Directorate of Municipal Affairs (GDMA), the Afghan Land Authority (ARAZI), and Ministry of Urban Development Affairs (MUDA), to improve national policies, legislation and guidelines

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